Molecule discovery holds promise for gene therapies for psoriasis

Scientists at BHP founder member the University of Birmingham have discovered a protein that could hold the key to novel gene therapies for skin problems including psoriasis – a common, chronic skin disease that affects over 100 million people worldwide.  The protein is a fragment of a larger molecule, called JARID2, which was previously believed … Continue reading “Molecule discovery holds promise for gene therapies for psoriasis”

Premier League footballers participate in new ground-breaking concussion study

BHP researchers from the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust (UHB) have launched a new study funded by The Drake Foundation to review and potentially enhance concussion diagnosis in football. This new study, supported by the Premier League Doctors Group, which is allowing access to players, is running throughout the 2018/19 … Continue reading “Premier League footballers participate in new ground-breaking concussion study”

Top award for translational biomedical researcher

A BHP clinician scientist and hepatologist Dr Ye Htun Oo has been awarded £1.7 million to fund translational biomedical research into autoimmune liver diseases. The Sir Jules Thorn Award for Biomedical Research is a single grant of up to £1.7 million awarded by the Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust. The Trust’s main objective is to fund translational research … Continue reading “Top award for translational biomedical researcher”

New sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma

Scientists at BHP founder member the University of Birmingham have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye. The surface of the eye (the cornea) is usually transparent, but scars resulting from eye infection or trauma make it opaque causing blurred vision or in extreme cases complete … Continue reading “New sight-saving treatment for eye infection or trauma”

Human brain ‘works backwards’ to retrieve memories, Birmingham study finds

When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at BHP founder member the University of Birmingham. Understanding more precisely how the brain retrieves information could help us better assess the reliability of eye witness accounts, for example of crime scenes, where people often … Continue reading “Human brain ‘works backwards’ to retrieve memories, Birmingham study finds”